Academics feed student minds, but extracurricular programs, clubs, and organizations feed their souls

By Judy Rimato, Assistant Superintendent of Communications and Planning, Klein ISD

At Klein Oak High, strong academics are only a part of the school’s renowned reputation. All students are strongly encouraged to join a club or organization beginning in their freshman year. At Klein Oak, extra-curricular opportunities involve nearly 2,253 students out of the approximately 3,725 students on campus. The campus’ goal is to increase that by at least 400 more students by the end of the year.

According to Principal Ron Webster, these organizations are tied to student courses or involve a tryout process. Clubs, on the other hand, are groups of students that meet together for a particular purpose or common interest. KOHS has more than 70 clubs and student organizations to date, which allows for an array of options for students to find those that best fits their particular interests.

Webster noted that some of the benefits of student involvement include helping students grow as a person and develop their interests and skills through a constructive outlet. Students also learn how to work together and establish leadership skills that will greatly benefit them after graduation. In fact, studies show that involved students are more likely to enroll in college, earn scholarships, and advance in various career opportunities. Extra-curricular activities also have a positive boost to the school climate, as the campus becomes energized when the student body and faculty work together and create a strong synergy of pride in Klein Oak.

The Klein ISD and community also benefits because the students unite for a common purpose, such as helping people in need through various fundraisers and/or activities, or working with younger students at other district campuses. Connections are made between students and the greater community, with programs that teach responsibility and important social issues such as teens texting while driving.

Academics are important, but clubs and organizations feed students’ souls. Encourage your child to get involved!

At Klein Oak High, strong academics are only a part of the school’s renowned reputation. All students are strongly encouraged to join a club or organization beginning in their freshman year. At Klein Oak, extra-curricular opportunities involve nearly 2,253 students out of the approximately 3,725 students on campus. The campus’ goal is to increase that by at least 400 more students by the end of the year.

According to Principal Ron Webster, these organizations are tied to student courses or involve a tryout process. Clubs, on the other hand, are groups of students that meet together for a particular purpose or common interest. KOHS has more than 70 clubs and student organizations to date, which allows for an array of options for students to find those that best fits their particular interests.

Webster noted that some of the benefits of student involvement include helping students grow as a person and develop their interests and skills through a constructive outlet. Students also learn how to work together and establish leadership skills that will greatly benefit them after graduation. In fact, studies show that involved students are more likely to enroll in college, earn scholarships, and advance in various career opportunities. Extra-curricular activities also have a positive boost to the school climate, as the campus becomes energized when the student body and faculty work together and create a strong synergy of pride in Klein Oak.

The Klein ISD and community also benefits because the students unite for a common purpose, such as helping people in need through various fundraisers and/or activities, or working with younger students at other district campuses. Connections are made between students and the greater community, with programs that teach responsibility and important social issues such as teens texting while driving.

Academics are important, but clubs and organizations feed students’ souls. Encourage your child to get involved!
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